Catalysing creativity: within and beyond the university

Tuesday 02 June 2015 -
13:30 to 14:45
Session 7.4. Queen Elizabeth II Centre, London.

The creative industries are recognised globally as a major catalyst for leading edge design and innovation, driving growth and investment. While the commercial benefits are potentially enormous, only by bridging the gap between future industry demands and education provision, will the true capacity of the creative industries be realised.

As nations recognise the need to broaden their economies in order to compete globally, the creative industries have been identified as a significant area for development. But to what extent does this impact upon connecting people and ideas and cultures? How can the flow and exchange of ideas and talent generate a creative force capable of turning technology into innovation? How can research co-operation be encouraged to produce intellectual property that can be translated into products and services that people desire?  Where are the new prospects for multilateral collaboration, in transforming challenges into opportunities within knowledge economies? If the creative industries are to live up to their potential, the education sector must lead and shape itself to create new, enduring curricula that merge science and technology, art and business, and indeed, span across disciplines and knowledge within and beyond the university.

This world café session will draw upon eight examples from distinguished speakers on collaboration between universities and industry, universities and creative sector bodies, research programmes and the internationalisation of higher and vocational education, looking at how the creative curricula may be enhanced through such collaborations.

Simon Dancey
Director - Cultural Skills Unit, British Council, UK

Simon is the Global Director for Cultural Skills Unit, an initiative working across arts and education. Previously the British Council Director for Wales and before that, International & Nations Director at Creative & Cultural Skills, the UK Sector Skills Council. As a practitioner he has worked as a professional musician. As well as policy and practice, he is now engaged as an academic, working on international cultural policy PhD. Session 7.4

Simon Dancey

Professor Paul Heritage
Professor of Drama and Performance, Queen Mary University of London, UK

Paul Heritage has created award-winning theatre-based research projects on human rights in UK and Brazilian prisons. More recent work in socially engaged arts practice has focused on policy exchange and UK-Brazil collaborative projects, bringing Brazilian companies including AfroReggae and Agência de Redes to work with UK cultural institutions and companies. Session 7.4

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Aileen Monaghan
Inspector of Education, Education Scotland, UK

Aileen Monaghan is an HMI with Education Scotland  and  subject specialist (SSI) for music.  She is also Lead Officer for Transformative Change in Education Scotland. Previously she was one of the team of writers for  Curriculum for Excellence (Expressive Arts team); head of a large inner city music department, a Music Technology Consultant and a member of “Masterclass”, a team of practictioners funded by the government to help advance ICT skills. Session 7.4

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Professor Ashis Jalote Parmar
Faculty Member, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, India

Ashis is a professor of Design thinking at IIMA and she consults corporate to nurture innovation. Ashis advocates the role of design thinking in engineering and management education to drive innovation. She received the Marie Curie Fellowship for her PhD in industrial design engineering at TUD, The Netherlands. Her research areas are decision support systems in healthcare, experience design, and user research & workflow optimization. Session 7.4

Professor Ashis Jalote Parmar

Joan Parr
Portfolio Manager - Education, Learning and Young People, Creative Scotland, UK

Before joining Creative Scotland, Joan was Head of Education at the Scottish Arts Council for 6 years, where she was responsible for “placing the arts and creativity at the heart of learning”. Previous posts have included education posts at the Scottish Arts Council, the National Galleries of Scotland and Historic Scotland, as well as posts in West Africa, India and the Middle East. Session 7.4

Joan Parr

Professor Pete Stollery
Head of Music and Professor of Composition and Electroacoustic Music, University of Aberdeen, UK

Professor Stollery is Head of Music at the University of Aberdeen, delivering courses on the creative applications of technology in music and music education. His workshop activity has taken him all over the UK and more recently to Argentina where he has been developing a relationship with Crear Vale la Pena, an Arts for Social Transformation organization which is working with government, schools and community groups to make the transformational power of the arts a reality. Session 7.4

 

Professor Pete Stollery

Mark Thorley
Programme Manager, Coventry University, UK

Mark’s work combines academic leadership with research and consultancy. He has developed and managed a series of Programmes including Music and Creative Technologies at Coventry University. His research focuses on the impact of technology on the creative industries based on his background as a classically trained musician, technologist and entrepreneur. As well as presenting internationally, his work appears in a range of publications. Session 7.4

Mark Thorley

Pradyumna Vyas
Director, National Institute of Design, India

Pradyumna Vyas earned a Masters in Industrial Design from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, and has over 27 years of professional and teaching experience, of which 22 at the NID. He took charge as the director of the Institute from April 2009. He has a special interest in design for social and sustainable development intervention for SMEs and crafts. He is Member Secretary of the India Design Council. Session 7.4

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