Mardin Museum in the Upper Tigris Valley  ©

Mardin Museum

In Turkey four projects have taken place which include; the protection of rock-cut reliefs at risk from damage and destruction; the documentation and protection of built heritage in south-east Turkey; the training of people in the Upper Tigris Valley to document disappearing intangible cultural heritage; and the safeguarding archaeological assets.

Find out more about the projects:

Carved in Stone

£100,000 awarded to the University of Liverpool to protect rock-cut reliefs at risk from damage and destruction in Turkey. This project is delivered in partnership with FETAV; Mediterranean Civilizations Research Institute (MCRI) Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey; and the Department of Archaeology, Hacettepe University.

Heritage skills for peace and capacity building

£1,265,578 awarded to Edinburgh World Heritage to focus on the documentation and protection of built heritage in south-east Turkey through surveys, conservation work and a training programme. This project is delivered in partnership with the Association for the Protection of Cultural Heritage (KMKD).

The project has focused on built heritage in south-east Turkey in two cities, Mardin and Antakya. Capital repair works on buildings in Mardin have been undertaken and a digitised buildings at risk register has been established. A programme of community engagement, learning and training has been delivered to 200 people including training sessions in south-east Turkey and a leadership school taking place in Edinburgh. 

Discover the story of the project in this online exhibition

Protecting Intangible Heritage in the Upper Tigris Valley

£99,911 awarded to Tarih Vakfi (History Foundation) to train people in the Upper Tigris Valley to document disappearing intangible cultural heritage, as well as establishing a new research resource to boost the region’s profile in the heritage and museum sector. This project is delivered in partnership with Tigris Development Agency and Mardin Museum.

The project has successfully recorded and documented 97 oral history recordings and provided training to 100 people. It also engaged with a range of local communities including students, families and local authorities.

Safeguarding Archaeological Assets of Turkey

£923,660 awarded to The British Institute at Ankara to build capacity and raise awareness for Safeguarding Archaeological Assets in Turkey (SARAT), with a focus on those in south-eastern provinces, Antalya and Istanbul. This project is delivered in partnership with Koc University Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED) and ICOM UK. 

The training was made available online and has been extremely popular. The first nation-wide public opinion poll of attitudes to archaeology in Turkey interviewed 3601 people. An online risk management and heritage course was completed by 3809 graduates. Five journalists' workshops were attended by 105 people and six ‘Archaeology in Local Contexts’ workshops were attended by a total audience of 311. Knowledge of SARAT has been promoted to the national and international heritage community through an extensive programme of outreach events and continues to generate interest.